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Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

  • Ramesh Khanna
  • Robert Mactier
  • Karl D. Nolph

Abstract

The potential use of the peritoneum as a dialyzing membrane was recognized as early as 1923 (1,2). Nevertheless, not until a permanent indwelling peritoneal catheter was developed in 1964 by Palmer et al. (3) and later modified by Tenckhoff (4) did long-term intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD) become a practical alternative to hemodialysis. However, probably mainly due to inadequate dialysis, the cumulative technique survival on IPD was low (5), and hemodialysis remained the predominant form of dialysis therapy.

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Residual Renal Function Dialysis Solution Dietary Protein Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramesh Khanna
    • 1
  • Robert Mactier
    • 1
  • Karl D. Nolph
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nephrology School of MedicineUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbiaUSA

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