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Abstract

Nephrologists are often called upon to aid in the treatment of poisoning in several ways: for guidance in the use of forced diuresis, for dialysis, and for expertise in sorbent hemoperfusion. Frequently, consultation is sought for patients known to have ingested drugs with known rates of removal by dialysis and hemoperfusion. Advice may also be sought for substance removal where the exposure may be to a recently marketed drug or chemical for which there is scanty information on active drug removal with artificial organs. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the factors governing active drug removal, to suggest areas in which drug removal may be invaluable or worthless, and to give guidelines for the employment of drug removal techniques.

Keywords

Activate Charcoal Drug Removal Forced Diuresis Exchange Blood Transfusion Paraquat Poisoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Winchester
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgetown University Medical CenterUSA

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