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Selenium in the environment

  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

Metals and metalloids are a natural part of the environment and life has evolved in contact with them ever since it first appeared on the surface of the planet. This is no less true of the life of humans and other animal species than it is of plants, bacteria and all other organisms. A balance, in coexistence and even in exploitation, has been developed between living matter and the elements. Sometimes organisms have had to protect themselves against chemically aggressive elements, either by the development of defensive mechanisms or by simple withdrawal from proximity. However, on the whole, the arrangement has been a remarkable success. Indeed, without metals and metalloids, life as we know it would be impossible.

Keywords

Selenium Level Selenium Supplementation Selenium Compound Sodium Selenate Threshold Limit Value 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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