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Selenium in health and disease II

Endemic selenium-related illness in humans
  • Conor Reilly

Abstract

It was inevitable that once the importance of selenium in animal health had begun to be recognised, the question would be asked whether it was also of significance to humans. The possibility began to be considered seriously following the identification in the early 1930s of alkali disease in livestock in seleniferous areas of the Rocky Mountain states in the USA. If cattle could be poisoned by eating selenium-rich plants, including grain, perhaps a similar effect occurred in farmers and their families who raised these animals and consumed locally grown foods.

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Dental Caries Sodium Selenite Selenium Level Selenium Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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