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Abstract

Selenium is one of the rarest of the elements. It is about 70th in abundance among the 88 that naturally occur in the earth’s crust.1 Yet, in spite of this rarity, it is a key component in living systems. Without it, neither humans nor any other animal could develop properly or survive for long.

Keywords

Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry International Atomic Energy Agency Inductively Couple Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometry Sodium Selenite Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conor Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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