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Aquatic Biotoxins: Design and Implementation of Seafood Safety Monitoring Programs

  • Douglas L. Park
  • Sonia E. Guzman-Perez
  • Rebeca Lopez-Garcia
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 161)

Abstract

When an issue on food safety is considered, it is important to state that absolute safety is not possible. Scientists and consumers alike concede that risks are associated with food as the result of compounds of chemical or microbiological origin. In fact, foods considered safe under normal conditions would not qualify for a “seal of approval” guaranteeing 100% safety if they were consumed in excessive quantities or used in an unusual manner. Relative food safety can be defined as the practical certainty that injury or damage will not result from the ingestion of a food or ingredient used in a reasonable and customary manner and quantity (57, 58).

Keywords

Okadaic Acid Domoic Acid Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Shellfish Poisoning Paralytic Shellfish 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas L. Park
    • 1
  • Sonia E. Guzman-Perez
    • 1
  • Rebeca Lopez-Garcia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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