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Nitroaromatic Munition Compounds: Environmental Effects and Screening Values

  • Sylvia S. Talmage
  • Dennis M. Opresko
  • Christopher J. Maxwell
  • Christopher J. E. Welsh
  • F. Michael Cretella
  • Patricia H. Reno
  • F. Bernard Daniel
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 161)

Abstract

Nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3, 5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX), N-methyl-N,2,4,6-tetranitroaniline (tetryl), and associated byproducts and degradation products, were released to the environment during manufacturing and load, assembly, and pack (LAP) processes at U.S. Army Ammunition Plants (AAPs) and other military facilities. As a result of the release of these nitroaromatic compounds into the environment, many AAPs have been placed on the National Priorities List for Superfund cleanup (Fed. Reg. 60:20330). Many of these sites cover a wide expanse of relatively undisturbed land and provide diverse habitats that support a variety of aquatic and terrestrial species. Nitroaromatics are potentially toxic to the indigenous species at these sites and present a significant concern for site remediation. Table 1 presents an overview of ranges of detected concentrations of the nitroaromatic compounds in groundwater, surface water, sediment, and soil at military and manufacturing sites.

Keywords

Fathead Minnow Bluegill Sunfish Water Quality Criterion Army Medical Research Aberdeen Prove Ground 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sylvia S. Talmage
    • 1
  • Dennis M. Opresko
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Maxwell
    • 1
  • Christopher J. E. Welsh
    • 1
  • F. Michael Cretella
    • 1
  • Patricia H. Reno
    • 1
  • F. Bernard Daniel
    • 2
  1. 1.Life Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.Ecological Exposure Research Division, National Exposure Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyCincinnatiUSA

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