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Culture and Exchange in Postclassic Oaxaca

A World-System Perspective
  • Joseph W. Whitecotton
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Since the publication of Immanuel Wallerstein’s world-system model in 1974, there has been increasing interest in applying this approach to premodern situations. So far, the perspective has been used to analyze ancient world-systems in Europe and in the Mediterranean (Ekholm 1980, 1981; Ekholm and Friedman 1982; Frankenstein 1979; Frankenstein and Rowlands 1978; Friedman and Rowlands 1977; Kohl 1978, 1979, 1987; Larsen 1987; Rowlands 1980, 1984, 1986, 1987), in Mesoamerica (Blanton and Feinman 1984; Blanton et al. 1981; Price 1986; Weigand 1978, 1979, 1982a, 1982b; Whitecotton and Pailes 1979, 1986), including attempts to better understand the relationship between Mesoamerica and the Southwest in pre-Columbian times (Di Peso 1980; Kelley 1981; Pailes and Whitecotton 1979; Plog et al. 1982; S. Plog 1986; Riley 1987; Upham 1986; Weigand 1982a, 1982b; Weigand et al. 1977; Whitecotton and Pailes 1986; Wilcox 1986). It has also been used to characterize exchange relationships among hunter-gatherers and agriculturists (Bender 1981; Friedman 1982) and in other situations involving nonstate societies (Baugh 1984; Gledhill and Rowlands 1982; Kristiansen 1982, 1987; Rowlands 1987; Upham 1982).

Keywords

World System Ancient World Spanish Conquest Archivo General Expository Passage 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph W. Whitecotton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA

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