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Rehabilitation pp 171-180 | Cite as

Rehabilitation Assessment and Planning for Head Trauma

  • Anne-Lise Christensen
  • Thomas W. Teasdale
Chapter
Part of the Human Brain Function book series (HBFA)

Abstract

As documented elsewhere in this book, the physical, psychological, and social consequences of traumatic brain injury have long been the subject of close investigation. Pioneering work with head-injured war victims was done by Goldstein in Germany and Luria in the then Soviet Union. However, until recently the view has tended to predominate, particularly in the medical community, that once an injury has occurred, little can be done. Ramon Y Cajal’s celebrated doctrine, formulated in the early decades of the century, that nerve cells, unlike those of many other of the body’s organs, cannot regenerate probably contributed much to the pessimism. An injured brain cannot repair itself in the way that an injured muscle may be able to do. Thus, it is believed that the functions subserved by any particular set of nerve cells are lost with the death of those nerve cells. Although it has been recognized that in fact a degree of recovery of physical and psychological function does occur, nonetheless this is expected typically to be only partial, reaching a plateau within the first year or so after injury.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program Head Trauma Psychosocial Outcome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne-Lise Christensen
    • 1
  • Thomas W. Teasdale
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Rehabilitation of Brain InjuryUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagen SDenmark
  2. 2.Psychological LaboratoryUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagen SDenmark

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