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Unconscious Defense Mechanisms and Social Mechanisms Used in National and Political Conflicts

  • Rafael Moses
Chapter

Abstract

We must confess that for all of us Rafael Moses had served as the main inspiration for the idea of the Vienna conference. He has been among the early pioneers of the application of psychoanalytic ideas to long-term political conflicts, and has been widely recognized as a world leader in this field, even though most psychoanalysts have kept their distance from such efforts. Moses took a clear stand in opposition to separating the public and the private spheres in psychoanalytic interpretation. Some of his psychoanalytic colleagues had found this nothing less than stunning, but he kept on working. Since the 1960s he has been actively involved in thinking and writing about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and about the unconscious aspects of all social conflicts. Eventually, his work became internationally recognized and appreciated.

Keywords

Projective Identification Social Mechanism Peace Process Guilt Feeling Israel Defense Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rafael Moses
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hebrew UniversityIsrael

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