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Quality assurance of MAP products

  • I. Alli
  • L. M. Weddig

Abstract

The assurance of safety and quality of MAP foods presents many special challenges to both the food technologist and the quality professional. In the preparation of these foods, both safety and quality issues must be addressed. Concerns to be addressed include raw materials and ingredients, packaging materials, the manufacturing and packaging processes, finished package evaluation, post-production storage and distribution and, finally, maintenance of these safety and quality attributes until consumption of the MAP product.

Keywords

Food Safety Total Quality Management Critical Control Point Food Safety Issue Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Alli
  • L. M. Weddig

There are no affiliations available

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