Aggression and dominance in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri)

Agonistic behaviour is reflected in vocal patterns
  • Janna Kirchhof
  • Kurt Hammerschmidt
  • Eberhard Fuchs
Chapter

Abstract

Tree shrews live solitary and defend their territories against intruding conspecifics of the same sex. Under laboratory conditions, housing of two males in one cage results in a stable dominance hierarchy1. The agonistic encounters between the two males are accompanied by intense reciprocal vocalisation and vary with their behaviour. The present study aimed to analyse the vocal repertoire of tree shrews during dyadic agonistic interactions, and to test whether call structure varied according to the dominance status or motivational state of the caller.

Keywords

Cage Defend Clomipramine 

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References

  1. 1.
    Fuchs, E., Kramer, M., Hermes, B., Netter, P., and Hiemke, C., 1996, Psychosocial stress in tree shrews: Clomipramine counteracts behavioral and endocrine changes. Pharmacol. Biochem. Behay. 54: 219–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Schrader, L., and Hammerschmidt, K., 1997, Computer-aided analysis of acoustic parameters in animal vocalisations: a multi-parametric approach. Bioacoustics 7: 247–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Hinz, H., and Zimmermann, E., 1989, The vocal repertoire of adult tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri). Behaviour 109: 142–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Morton, E. S., 1977, On the occurrence and significance of motivation-structural rules in some bird and mammal sounds. Am. Naturalist 111: 855–869.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janna Kirchhof
    • 1
  • Kurt Hammerschmidt
    • 1
  • Eberhard Fuchs
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of NeurobiologyGerman Primate CentreGöttingenGermany

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