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Causal Structure of Alcohol Use and Problems in Early Life

Multilevel Etiology and Implications for Prevention
  • Robert A. Zucker
Part of the Issues in Children’s and Families’ Lives book series (IICL, volume 1)

Abstract

This is a chapter that examines the causes of adolescent alcohol use and abus E. Alcohol is a unique dru G. It’s the nation’s most commonly abused drug, vet it can have some healthful benefits and is a part of many common cultural ritual S. At the same time, its use is associated with a number of costly problem S. This chapter will discuss alcohol’s unique status and explore the factors influencing the development of alcohol abus E. We will give special attention to the relationship between behavioral under-control and alcohol abuse, as well as the inter-relation of risk factors of abus E. Finally, the implications of our understanding of the development of alcohol abuse on prevention efforts are discussed.

Keywords

Alcohol Abuse Antisocial Behavior Alcohol Dependence Binge Drinking Alcohol Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

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  • Robert A. Zucker

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