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Prehistoric Exchange in the Southeast

  • Jay K. Johnson
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

There have been numerous definitions of the Southeast as a culture area based on various criteria (Smith 1986: Fig 1:1) and, as Smith has pointed out, the problem is compounded when prehistoric data are considered since the boundary shifts back and forth through time. There is general agreement, however, that the Southeast includes at least the Lower Mississippi Valley on the west and the coastal plain and southern half of the Appalachians to the east. This brings up one other more immediate consideration in delineating the area to be covered in this chapter. Gibson deals with the lower Mississippi Valley in Chapter 6, Brose covers the Midwest in Chapter 8, and Stewart reviews trade in the Middle Atlantic states in Chapter 4. The area that remains covers most of the states of Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

Keywords

Meteoritic Iron Archaeological Investigation American Antiquity Interregional Trade Late Archaic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay K. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MississippiUniversityUSA

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