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Late Archaic through Late Woodland Exchange in the Middle Atlantic Region

  • R. Michael Stewart
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

In the Middle Atlantic region, extensive exchange networks are first visible during the Late Archaic period, or after 2500 B.C. This chapter provides an overview of the evidence for prehistoric trade and exchange in the Middle Atlantic region from approximately 2500 B.C. until the time of concerted European contact during the early seventeenth century. Distinctive types of exchange networks are defined and their function and relationships in prehistoric societies are explored. Detailed treatments of data, definition of relevant terms, and discussion of the assumptions upon which this endeavor is based are found elsewhere (Stewart 1984a, 1989).

Keywords

Trade Good American Archaeology Projectile Point Late Archaic Marine Shell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Michael Stewart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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