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Other Switches and the MCT

  • R. S. Ramshaw

Abstract

The seven power semiconductor switches that are discussed in Chapters 3 to 9 are established devices. Each has a range of applications that suits it best. At one end of the scale there is the low-frequency, high power thyristor and at the other end of the scale there is the high-frequency, low-power MOSFET.

Keywords

Junction Temperature Gate Signal Semiconductor Switch Silicon Control Rectifier Negative Gate Voltage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

  1. Baliga, B.J. Modern Power Devices. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1987.Google Scholar
  2. Bose, B.K. (ED). Modern Power Electronics — Evolution, Technology and Applications. New York: IEEE Press, 1992.Google Scholar
  3. Ghandi, S.K. Semiconductor Power Devices. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1987Google Scholar
  4. Grant, D.A. and J. Gowar. Power MOSFETs; Theory and Applications. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1989.Google Scholar
  5. Humphreys, M.J. et al. (EDS). Philips Power Semiconductor Applications. Philips, Hazel Grove, U.K.Google Scholar
  6. Mohan, N., T.M. Underland, and P. Robbins. Power Electronics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 1989.Google Scholar
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  8. Taylor, Paul D. Thyristor Design and Realization. Chichester, U.K: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1987.Google Scholar
  9. Thorborg, Kjeld. Power Electronics. Hemel Hempstead: Prentice-Hall International (UK) Ltd., 1988.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© R.S. Ramshaw 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Ramshaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of WaterlooOntarioCanada

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