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Design of Playback Experiments: The Thornbridge Hall NATO ARW Consensus

  • Peter K. McGregor
  • Clive K. Catchpole
  • Torben Dabelsteen
  • J. Bruce Falls
  • Leonida Fusani
  • H. Carl Gerhardt
  • Francis Gilbert
  • Andrew G. Horn
  • Georg M. Klump
  • Donald E. Kroodsma
  • Marcel M. Lambrechts
  • Karen E. McComb
  • Douglas A. Nelson
  • Irene M. Pepperberg
  • Laurene Ratcliffe
  • William A. Searcy
  • Daniel M. Weary
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 228)

Abstract

Playback is an experimental technique commonly used to investigate the significance of signals in animal communication systems. It involves replaying recordings of naturally occurring or synthesised signals to animals and noting their response. Playback has made a major contribution to our understanding of animal communication, but like any other technique, it has its limitations and constraints.

Keywords

External Validity Animal Communication Natural Signal Playback Experiment Execution Error 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter K. McGregor
  • Clive K. Catchpole
  • Torben Dabelsteen
  • J. Bruce Falls
  • Leonida Fusani
  • H. Carl Gerhardt
  • Francis Gilbert
  • Andrew G. Horn
  • Georg M. Klump
  • Donald E. Kroodsma
  • Marcel M. Lambrechts
  • Karen E. McComb
  • Douglas A. Nelson
  • Irene M. Pepperberg
  • Laurene Ratcliffe
  • William A. Searcy
  • Daniel M. Weary

There are no affiliations available

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