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The Unemployed: Unmet Physical Need and Other Effects

  • Edward J. O’Boyle
Chapter

Abstract

From the very beginning, the labor force concepts employed in the Current Population Survey have been viewed as measures of the supply of labor [Bancroft, p. 188]. Further, the concept of unemployment in the CPS has been seen as measuring the “extent of unutilized labor immediately available in the economy” [Stein, p. 1409]. The CPS focuses on activity; that is, on what the person was doing during a specific week. Thus, information on the type of work done by the employed and the unemployed and the industry in which they labor has been regularly collected, extensively analyzed, and routinely reported for more than 50 years.

Keywords

Mental Health Status Criminal Behavior Unemployment Insurance Economic Hardship Phillips Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. O’Boyle
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana Tech UniversityUSA

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