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Productivity, Profitability, and Economic Insecurity

  • Edward J. O’Boyle
Chapter

Abstract

For some time, social economists and conventional economists alike have taken note of a reversal in the historic rise in living standards in the U.S. and its serious consequences. Namely, for some persons and families, living standards of late have not improved at all and, worse yet, for others their financial fortunes have actually deteriorated. One reason commonly assigned for this economic malaise is a low rate of improvement in productivity. Wallace Peterson, for example, points to 1973 as a “watershed year” for fundamental changes in weekly earnings, family income, and productivity and has branded 20 years of sluggish economic performance the “silent depression” [Peterson, pp. 9, 42].

Keywords

Grocery Store Creative Destruction Revolutionary Change Retailing Industry Economic Insecurity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. O’Boyle
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana Tech UniversityUSA

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