Personalist Economics: Reconstructing Economics on Different Philosophical Premises

  • Edward J. O’Boyle


Personalist economics is at once something old and something new. It is something old in the sense that it is the most recent and, we hope, the most advanced thinking about economic affairs from the perspective of Catholic social thought in its more than 100-year history of development. Personalist economics is something new in the sense that little or nothing has been published on this subject, either as a book or in the periodical literature.1


Human Nature Human Person Economic Order Economic Affair Economic Science 


Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.


  1. Becker, Joseph M. and others. “Policy Recommendations,” In Aid of the Unemployed, edited by Joseph M. Becker, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1965.Google Scholar
  2. Encyclicals of a Century. Derby, NY: Daughters of St. Paul, circa 1942.Google Scholar
  3. “The First Solidarity Congress,” World Affairs,Summer 1982.Google Scholar
  4. Gundlach, Gustay. “Solidarist Economics: Philosophy and Socio-Economic Theory in Pesch,” Social Order, April 1951.Google Scholar
  5. John Paul II. Laborem Exercens, Boston: Daughters of St. Paul, 1981.Google Scholar
  6. Mueller, Franz. “The Solidarist Middle Road,” Central-Blatt and Social Justice, February 1940.Google Scholar
  7. Mulcahy, Richard. The Economics of Heinrich Pesch, New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1952.Google Scholar
  8. Newman, John Henry. The Idea of a University, New York: Longmans, Green, and Company, 1947.Google Scholar
  9. Schuyler, Joseph B. “Heinrich Pesch, S.J.: 1854–1926,” Social Theorists, edited by Clement S. Mihanovich, Milwaukee: The Bruce Publishing Company, 1953.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. O’Boyle
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana Tech UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations