Photometric quantities and temperature

  • Joseph Caniou
Chapter

Abstract

Physical bodies in proximity, provided that they are at a temperatures different to absolute zero, exchange energy. Without producing hypotheses on the origin of this energy we know that, in normal conditions, modes of transmission are
  • convection by natural or forced circulation of a fluid between separated elements;

  • conduction by diffusion of energy inside the same material or between two assembled elements;

  • radiation by propagation of an electromagnetic wave through a medium or in a vacuum.

Only the transfer of energy by radiation will be considered in the following text.

Keywords

Microwave Convection Attenuation Platinum Boiling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Caniou
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre d’Electronique de l’Armement (CELAR)DGABruzFrance

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