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Overview of Bioheat Transfer

  • Chun-Sing Orr
  • Robert C. Eberhart
Part of the Lasers, Photonics, and Electro-Optics book series (LPEO)

Abstract

Medical use of lasers began soon after the first ruby laser was invented in 1960.1 Laser radiation is now used routinely in surgery to incise, coagulate, or vaporize tissues. The use of lasers in surgery introduces some desirable features such as increased precision, improved hemostasis, and less tissue manipulation.2 The biological effects of laser energy depend on the laser wavelength, the irradiance, the duration of irradiation, and optical as well as thermal properties of the tissue involved. The laser-tissue interaction mechanisms may be thermal, photochemical, or mechanical in nature. Surgical procedures that involve coagulation or ablation of tissue are thermal.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Free Convection Heat Gain Heat Transfer Mechanism Gray Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chun-Sing Orr
    • 1
  • Robert C. Eberhart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasDallasUSA

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