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Structure and Reaction Mechanism of the β-Glycosidase from the Archaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus

  • Marco Moracci
  • Maria Ciaramella
  • Laurence H. Pearl
  • Mosé Rossi
Chapter

Abstract

Hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea represent the organisms at the upper-temperature border of life. They have been almost exclusively isolated from environments with temperatures between 80 and 115°C, such as hot springs, solfatara fields, submarine hydrothermal areas or abyssal hot-vent systems (Brock, 1986). In particular, hyperthermophilic microorganisms living in marine abyssal biotopes grow optimally in presence of combined stress factors, for istance high pressure and temperatures above 100°C. Most of the microorganisms growing around 100°C belong to Archaea (formerly the archaebacteria) one of the three domains of the living world. On the basis of the recent hypothesis that life appeared at high temperatures, it has been proposed that archaeal hyperthermophiles could be the most ‘primitive’ living organisms and the closest to the universal ancestor.

Keywords

Glycosyl Hydrolase Glu206 Residue Transglycosylating Activity SULFOLOBUS SOLFATARICUS Hyperthermophilic Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Moracci
    • 1
  • Maria Ciaramella
    • 1
  • Laurence H. Pearl
    • 2
  • Mosé Rossi
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Protein Biochemistry and EnzymologyNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Structural Biochemistry Section Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUniversity College LondonUK
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e BiologicaUniversity of NaplesNaplesItaly

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