Advertisement

Cell Cultures from the Abalone Haliotis Tuberculata

A New Tool for in Vitro Study of Biomineralization
  • D. Sud
  • S. Auzoux-Bordenave
  • M. Martin
  • D. Doumenc
Chapter

Abstract

The internal part of most molluscan shells is made of mother-of-pearl which is secreted by the mantle. Because of its economically importance, particularly in perliculture, the structure and formation of nacre has long been studied by several authors (Gregoire, 1972; Wilbur et Saleuddin, 1983; Cuff, 1992). Lot of works lead on the specificity of an organic matrix secreted by the cells of the mantle which initiates the crystal nucleation (Erben and Watabe, 1974; Weiner and Traub, 1984; Belcher et al., 1996; Bowen and Tang, 1996). However, the biological mechanisms involved in biomineralization remain relatively unknown because of the difficulty to analyse the deposit of crystal.

Keywords

Primary Cell Culture Indigo Carmin Molluscan Shell Invertebrate Cell Principal Cell Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Auzoux-Bordenave, S., 1995, La branchie de palourde Ruditapesdecussatus ( Mollusque, Bivalve). Un modèle expérimental en pathologie et en écotoxicologie marine. Thèse de Doctorat de r“ cycle. Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 200 p.Google Scholar
  2. Belcher, A.M., X.H., Wu, R.J., Christensen, P.K., Hansma, G.D., Stucky and D.E., Morse, 1996, Nature, 381: 56–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bowen, C.E. and H. Tang, 1996, Comp. Biochem. Phvsiol., 115A (4): 269–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cuif, 1992, In Doumengue F. and A. Toulemont, Mother-of-pearls and pearls, ed. by Monaco-Musée Océanographique, pp. 77–87.Google Scholar
  5. Duvail, L., 1997, Caractérisation de molécules apparentées aux peptides dérivés du géne de la calcitonine et rôle du CGRP au cours de la croissance chez l’ormeau Haliotis tuherculata. Diplôme pratique de l’Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, 93 p.Google Scholar
  6. Erben, H.K. and N., Watabe, 1974, Nature,248:128–130.Google Scholar
  7. Gregoire, C., 1972, In Florkin M. and B.T. Scheer, Chemical Zoology, II, ed. by New York Academic Press, pp. 45–102.Google Scholar
  8. Lebel, J.M., W., Giard, P., Favrel, and E., Boucaud-Camou,1996, Biol. Cell., 86: 67–72.Google Scholar
  9. Martoja, R. and M., Martoja, 1967, Initiation aux techniques de l’histologie animale. Ed. by Masson et Cie Paris, 345 p.Google Scholar
  10. Naganuma, T., B.M., Degnan, K., Horikoshi and D.E., Morse, 1994, Mol. Mar. Biol. Biotechnol., 3: 131–140.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Silve, C., E., Lopez, B., Vidal, D.C., Smith, S., Camprasse, G., Camprasse and G., Couly, 1992, Calcif. Tissue lot., 51, pp. 363–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Toullec, J.Y., Y., Crozat, J., Patrois, and P., Porcheron, 1996, Journal of Crustacean Biology, 16(4):643–649. Weiner, S. and W., Traub, 1984, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B304: 425–434.Google Scholar
  13. Wilbur, K.M. and A.S.M., Saleuddin,I 983, Shell formation. The Mollusca, 4, ed. by Academic Press, pp. 235–287.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Sud
    • 1
  • S. Auzoux-Bordenave
    • 1
  • M. Martin
    • 1
  • D. Doumenc
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biologie des Invertébrés Marins et Malacologie URA CNRS 699Muséum National d’Histoire NaturelleParisFrance

Personalised recommendations