Advertisement

Meiotic Cell Cycle Control by Mos in Ascidian Oocytes

  • Gian Luigi Russo
  • Keiichiro Kyozuka
  • Marcella Marino
  • Elisabetta Tosti
  • Martin Wilding
  • Maria Laura de Simone
  • Brian Dale
Chapter

Abstract

Mitotic cell division cycle is regulated by several control mechanisms generally known as checkpoints, whose main function is to ensure that critical events in the cell division such as DNA replication and chromosome segregation occur with high fidelity and in the correct order and time. A recent view of cell cycle regulation, indicate that checkpoints work as signal transduction pathways with their initiating signals, sensors, transducers, and effectors (Elledge, 1996). Similarly, meiotic cell cycle regulation have specific checkpoints and two of them have been recently characterized at molecular level. The first ensures the completion of recombination before the formation of meiosis I spindle; the second blocks anaphase I until all the paired chromosomes are correctly attached to the spindle (Page and Orr-Weaver, 1997). However, the most intriguing difference between mitosis and meiosis respect to cell cycle regulation, is the ability of animal oocytes to arrest at specific stage during maturation, and maintain this block for extremely long time: from years (frog) to decades (human) (Sagata, 1996a,b). It is universally accepted that the meiotic block is due to the activity of a cytostatic factor (CSF) primarily identified by Masui (Masui and Markert, 1971).

Keywords

Cell Cycle Regulation Oocyte Maturation CIONA INTESTINALIS Meiotic Cell Cycle Ascidian Ciona Intestinalis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dale, B. 1983, Fertilization in animals. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
  2. Elledge, S. J. 1996, Science 274: 1664–1672.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Jaffe, L. F. 1985, In Biology offertilization vol. 3 (eds. C. B. Metz and A. Monroy), pp 127–165. San Diego: Academic Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Masui, Y. and Markert, C. L. 1971, J. Exp. Zool. 177: 129–146.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Page, A. W. and Orr-Weaver, T. L. 1997,. Current Opinion in Genetics and Development 7: 23–31.Google Scholar
  6. Russo, G. L., Kyozuka, K., Antonazzo, L., Tosti, E. and Dale, B. 1996, Development 122: 1995–2003.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Sagata, N., Watanabe, N., Vande Woude, G. F. and Ikawa, Y. 1989,. Nature 34: 512–518.Google Scholar
  8. Sagata, N. 1996a, Trends Cell Biol. 6: 22–28.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Sagata, N. 1996b, BioEssays 19: 1–9.Google Scholar
  10. Whitaker, M. and Patel, R. 1990, Development. 108: 525–542.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gian Luigi Russo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Keiichiro Kyozuka
    • 3
  • Marcella Marino
    • 1
  • Elisabetta Tosti
    • 1
  • Martin Wilding
    • 1
  • Maria Laura de Simone
  • Brian Dale
    • 1
  1. 1.Stazione Zoologica ‘Anton Dohrn’NapoliItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Food Science and TechnologyNational Research CouncilAvellinoItaly
  3. 3.Asamushi Marine Biological StationAsamushi, AomoriJapan
  4. 4.Istituto Scienze Dell’AlimentazioneCNRAvellinoItaly

Personalised recommendations