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Fundamental Mathematical and Physical Concepts in Acoustics

  • John M. Eargle

Abstract

The student of musical acoustics should have an intuitive feel for basic physics and mathematics. Freshman level courses in elementary mechanics and algebra are useful prerequisites, but are not absolutely essential. What is required is familiarity with the basic physical quantities of length, mass, and time, and their related concepts of velocity, acceleration, power, and energy. On these fundamentals of mechanics we will construct the models of resonant systems and subsequent propagation of sound through various media. Basic sound fields will be discussed, as will the concepts of level and the decibel.

Keywords

Sound Pressure Sound Source Fundamental Concept Free Field Sound Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Eargle

There are no affiliations available

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