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Surveying

  • J. F. A. Moore
  • B. J. R. Ping

Abstract

Surveying is used here as a term to cover a wide range of techniques which rely primarily on visual observation with instrumentation to obtain a measurement of length or determination of position from which movement may be deduced. The methods generally require the presence of an observer on site at the time of measurement, as opposed to the techniques described in chapter 5, which can be operated remotely once installed.

Keywords

Control Point Total Station Monitoring Point Building Research Absolute Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. A. Moore
  • B. J. R. Ping

There are no affiliations available

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