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The Graduate Record Examination and the Minority Student

  • Luis Nieves

Abstract

As the role of standardized tests has increased in the admission process for higher education, more questions have been raised surrounding the effectiveness of these measures for minority and economically deprived students. Because of a lack of relevant data prior to 1974–1975, the Graduate Record Examination Board (GREB), in response to these expressed concerns, cited the findings of studies of other tests similar to the GRE that suggest that, given the traditional nature of a curriculum of academic study, standardized tests predict as well for minorities as for the traditional student (Cleary and Hilton, 1968; Cleary, 1968; Biag-gio, 1966). With data on the GRE population now available, the GREB is currently sponsoring research that will more directly test the above hypothesis.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luis Nieves
    • 1
  1. 1.Educational Testing ServicePrincetonUSA

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