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Horn Systems

  • John M. Eargle

Abstract

The history of the horn as an acoustic device dates to antiquity. Early humans used hollowed animal horns for signaling over long distances, and in time the horn became the basis of a number of musical instruments.

Keywords

Motion Picture Radiation Resistance Section View Perforated Plate Acoustical Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Eargle

There are no affiliations available

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