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Multi-Echelon Systems

  • Sven Axsäter
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 26)

Abstract

In Chapters 3 and 4 we have considered a single installation. In practice, though, multi-stage, or multi-echelon, inventory systems are common, where a number of installations are coupled to each other. When distributing products over large geographical areas many companies use an inventory system with a central warehouse close to the production facility and a number of local stocking points close to the customers in different areas. In production, stocks of raw materials, components, and finished products are similarly coupled to each other. To obtain efficient control of such inventory systems it is necessary to use special methods that take the connection between different stocks into account. In this chapter we will show when and how such methods can be used.

Keywords

Inventory System Safety Stock Inventory Position Reorder Point Material Requirement Planning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

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  • Sven Axsäter

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