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Intelligence and Personality in Social Behavior

  • Martin E. Ford
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The overall goal of this chapter is to provide the reader with an integrated conceptual framework for understanding human intelligence and personality as these qualities are reflected in dynamic, complex patterns of social behavior. To accomplish this rather broad and challenging objective, each of the three major constructs represented in this chapter—personality, intelligence, and social behavior—are defined and explicated in separate sections designed to build upon one another in an organized, systematic manner. The intended result is a rich, coherent framework of considerable practical utility (M. Ford & D. Ford, 1987).

Keywords

Social Behavior Social Competence Personality Development Goal Attainment Personal Goal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin E. Ford
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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