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Intelligence and Personality in Criminal Offenders

  • David J. Baxter
  • Laurence L. Motiuk
  • Sylvie Fortin
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The notion that criminal behavior is a product of aberrant cognitive processing or fundamental character defects has a long history, apparent in the early concepts of “moral imbecility” and “moral insanity” popularized in the 1800s. At one point, it was even suggested that mental deficiency was the chief cause of criminal behavior (Caplan, 1965; Pichot, 1978). In contrast, some of the major criminological theories of the past few decades, dominated by a more sociological orientation, have discounted individual psychological factors entirely, viewing crime as an outcome of certain societal forces and inequalities (see Andrews & Wormith, 1989).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Criminal Behavior Juvenile Delinquency Social Intelligence Criminal Offender 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Baxter
    • 1
  • Laurence L. Motiuk
    • 2
  • Sylvie Fortin
    • 3
  1. 1.Rideau Treatment CentreUniversity of Ottawa and Ministry of Correctional ServicesMerrickvilleCanada
  2. 2.Carleton University and Correctional Service of CanadaOttawaCanada
  3. 3.School of PsychologyUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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