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A Critical Review of the Measurement of Personality and Intelligence

  • Paul Kline
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Intelligence tests cannot be understood without reference to the factor analysis of abilities. Essentially such tests aim to measure the factor (or factors) identified as intelligence. Thus a brief discussion of the factor analysis of abilities is essential in this chapter.

Keywords

Social Desirability Objective Test Personality Test Intelligence Test Personality Questionnaire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Kline
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ExeterExeterEngland

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