Advertisement

Abstract

The preceding thirty-eight chapters represent a pioneering effort to portray a comprehensive picture of the “state of the art” in the study of multigenerational transmission of trauma. The goal of this book is to map the international landscape of this emerging field by bringing together the work of different scholars/researchers from around the world. This volume reveals how they view, understand, and conceptualize the multigenerational legacies of trauma of multiple populations and places their findings within the multidimensional, multidisciplinary, integrative (TCMI) framework (see the Introduction). For some of these populations, this is the first time such issues have appeared in print.

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Stress International Criminal Court Intergenerational Transmission Jewish Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albeck, J. H. (1994). Intergenerational consequences of trauma: Reframing traps in treatment theory—a second-generational perspective. In M. B. Williams and J. F. Sommer, Jr. (Eds.), Handbook of post-traumatic therapy (pp. 106–125 ). Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger.Google Scholar
  2. Bar-On, D. (1994). Fear and hope: Life-stories of five Israeli. families of Holocaust survivors, three generations in a family. Tel Aviv: Lochamei Hagetaot-Hakibbutz Hameuchad. (Hebrew )Google Scholar
  3. Bassiouni, M. C. ( 1997, Spring). From Versailles to Rwanda in seventy-five years: The need to establish a permanent international criminal court. Harvard Human Rights Journal, 10, 11–62.Google Scholar
  4. Bowen, M. (1978). Family therapy in clinical practice. New York: Aronson.Google Scholar
  5. Commission on the Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. (1982). Personal justice denied. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  6. Crocq, M.-A., Macher, J.-P., Barros-Beck, J., Rosenberg, S. J., and Duval, F. (1993). Posttraumatic stress disorder in World War II prisoners of war from Alsace-Lorraine who survived captivity in the USSR. In J. P. Wilson and B. Raphael (Eds.), International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes (pp. 253–261 ). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Danieli, Y. (1981 a). On the achievement of integration in aging survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14(2),191–210.Google Scholar
  8. Danieli, Y. ( 1981b, March 15–16). Exploring the factors in Jewish identity formation (in children of survivors). In Consultation on the psycho-dynamics of Jewish identity: Summary of proceedings (pp. 22–25 ). American Jewish Committee and the Central Conference of American Rabbis. New York.Google Scholar
  9. Danieli, Y. (1984). Psychotherapists’ participation in the conspiracy of silence about the Holocaust. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 1 (1), 23–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Danieli, Y. (1985). The treatment and prevention of long-term effects and intergenerational transmission of victimization: A lesson from Holocaust survivors and their children. In C. R. Figley (Ed.), Trauma and its wake (pp. 295–313 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  11. Danieli, Y. (1989). Mourning in survivors and children of survivors of the Nazi Holocaust: The role of group and community modalities. In D. R. Dietrich, and P. C. Shabad (Eds.), The problem of loss and mourning: Psychoanalytic perspectives (pp. 427–460 ). Madison, CT: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  12. Danieli, Y. ( 1991, January 6). Refections on perversions of freedom after the fall of the wall. Presentation to the Intergenerational Community Meeting of the Group Project for Holocaust Survivors and their Children. New York.Google Scholar
  13. Danieli, Y. (1992). Preliminary reflections from a psychological perspective. In T. C. van Boven, C. Flinterman, F. Grunfeld, and I. Westendorp (Eds.), The Right to Restitution, Compensation and Rehabilitation for Victims of Gross Violations of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Netherlands Institute of Human Rights [Stu-dieen Informatiecentrum Mensenrechten, Special issue] No. 12 (pp. 196–213 ).Google Scholar
  14. N.J. Kritz (Ed.). (1995). Transitional justice: How emerging democracies reckon with former regimes. (Vol. 1, pp. 572–582 ). Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace.Google Scholar
  15. Danieli, Y. (1993). The diagnostic and therapeutic use of the multi-generational family tree in working with survivors and children of survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. In J. P. Wilson and B. Raphael (Eds.), International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes (pp. 889–898 ). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Danieli, Y. (1994a). Trauma to the family: Intergenerational sources of vulnerability and resilience. In J. T. Reese and E. Scrivner (Eds.), The law enforcement families: Issues and answers (pp. 163–175 ). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation.Google Scholar
  17. Danieli, Y. (I 994b). As survivors age-Part I. National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Clinical Quarterly, 4(1), 1–7.Google Scholar
  18. Danieli, Y. (1994c). Countertransference, trauma and training. In J. P. Wilson and J. Lindy (Eds.), Countertransference in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (pp. 368–388 ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  19. Danieli, Y., Rodley, N. S., and Weisaeth, L. (1996). Introduction. In Y. Danieli, N. S. Rodley, and L. Weisaeth (Eds.), International responses to traumatic stress: Humanitarian, human rights, justice, peace and development contributions, collaborative actions and future initiatives (pp. 1–14 ). Published for and on behalf of the United Nations. Amityville, NY: Baywood.Google Scholar
  20. Danieli, Y., Rodley, N. S., and Weisaeth, L. (Eds.). (1996). International responses to traumatic stress: Humanitarian, human rights, justice, peace and development contributions, collaborative actions and future initiatives. Published for and on behalf of the United Nations. Amityville, NY: Baywood.Google Scholar
  21. Dubrow, N., Liwski, N. I., Palacios, C., and Gardinier, M. (1996). Traumatized children: Helping child victims of violence. In Y. Danieli, N. S. Rodley, and L. Weisaeth (Eds.), International responses to traumatic stress: Humanitarian, human rights, justice, peace and development contributions, collaborative actions and future initiatives (pp. 327–346 ). Published for and on behalf of the United Nations. Amityville, NY: Baywood.Google Scholar
  22. Duffy, H. (1996). The truth behind reconciliation. In Fundacion Myrna Mack (compiladora) Amnistia y Reconciliacion Nacional: Encontrando el Comino dela Justicia [Amnesty and national reconciliation: Finding the way of justice]. Guatemala: F and G Editores. (Spanish)Google Scholar
  23. Edelman, L., Kordon, D., and Lagos, D. (1992). Argentina: Physical disease and bereavement in a social context of human rights violations and impunity. In L. H. M. van Willigen (Chair), The Limitations of current concepts of post traumatic stress disorders regarding the consequences of organized violence. Session presented at the World conference of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  24. Eitinger, L. (1980). The concentration camp syndrome and its late sequelae. In J. E. Dimsdale (Ed.), Survivors, victims, and perpetrators: Essays on the Nazi Holocaust (pp. 127–162 ). New York: Hemisphere.Google Scholar
  25. Elder, G. H., Jr., Caspi, A., and Downey, G. (1986). Problem behavior and family relationships: Life course and inter-generational themes. In A. Sorensen, F. Weinert, and L. Sherrod (Eds.), Human development and the life course: Multidisciplinary perspectives (pp. 293–340 ). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  26. Engel, G. L. (1977). The need for a new medical model: A challenge for biomedicine. Science, 196, 129–136.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Engel, G. L. (1996). From biomedical to biopsychosocial: I. Being scientific in the human domain. Families, Systems and Health: Journal of Collaborative Family Health Care, 14(4), 425–433.Google Scholar
  28. Figley, C. R. (1983). Catastrophes: An overview of family reactions. In C. R. Figley and H. I. McCubbin (Eds.), Stress and the family: Coping with catastrophe (Vol. 2, pp. 3–20 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  29. Figley, C. R., and Kleber, R. J. (1995). Beyond the “victim”: Secondary traumatic stress. In R. J. Kleber, C. R. Figley, and B. P. R. Gersons (Eds.), Beyond trauma: Cultural and societal dynamics (pp. 75–98 ). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  30. Goldstone, R. (1995). Interview with Judge Richard Goldstone. Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems, 5, 374–385.Google Scholar
  31. Green, B. L., Karol, M., and Grace, M. C. (1994). Children and disaster: Age, gender and parental effects on PTSD symptoms. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 30, 945–951.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Hard, Z., Kahana, B., and Wilson, J. P. (1993). War and remembrance: The legacy of Pearl Harbor. In J. P. Wilson and B. Raphael (Eds.), International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes (pp. 263–274 ). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  33. Herman, J. (1992). Trauma and recovery. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  34. Keller, R. (1988). Children of Jewish Holocaust survivors: Relationship of family communication to family cohesion, adaptability and satisfaction. Family Therapy, 15, 223–237.Google Scholar
  35. Keilson, H. (1992). Sequential traumatization in children. Jerusalem: Hebrew University, Magnes Press.Google Scholar
  36. Kendler, K. S. (1988). Indirect vertical cultural transmission: A model for nongenetic parental influences on the liability to psychiatric illness. American Journal of Psychiatry, 145(6), 657–665.Google Scholar
  37. Kessler, R. C., Sonnega, A., Bromet, E., Hughes, M., and Nelson, C. B. (1995). Posttraumatic stress disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Archives of General Psychiatry, 52, 1048–1060.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Kestenberg, J. S. (1989). Transposition revisited: Clinical, therapeutic, and developmental considerations. In P. Marcus and A. Rosenberg (Eds.), Healing their wounds: Psychotherapy with Holocaust survivors and their families (pp. 67–82 ). New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  39. Kinston, W., and Cohen, J. (1986). Primal repression: Clinical and theoretical aspects. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 67, 337–355.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Kleber, R. (1995). Epilogue. In R. J. Kleber, C. R. Figley, and B. P. R. Gersons (Eds.), Beyond trauma: Cultural and societal dynamics (pp. 299–305 ). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  41. Legters, L. H. (1988). The American genocide. Policy Studies Journal, 16(4), 768–777.Google Scholar
  42. Lifton, R. J. (1979). The broken connection. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
  43. Lomranz, J., Shmotkin, D., Zechovoy, A., and Rosenberg, E. (1985). Time orientation in Nazi concentration camp survivors: Forty years after. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 55 (2), 230–236.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Major, E. E. (1996). The impact of the Holocaust on the second generation: Norwegian Jewish Holocaust survivors and their children. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 9(3), 441–454.Google Scholar
  45. Mangelsdorf, A. D. (1985). Lessons learned and forgotten: The need for prevention and mental health interventions in disaster preparedness. Journal of Community Psychology, 13, 239–257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Marsella, A. J., Friedman, M. J., Gerrity, E. T., and Scurfield, R. M. (Eds.). (1996). Ethnocultural aspects ofposttraumatic stress disorder: Issues, research, and clinical applications Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  47. McFarlane, A. C., Blumbergs, V., Policansky, S. K., and Irwin, C. (1985). A longitudinal study of psychological morbidity in children due to a natural disaster. Unpublished manuscript. Department of Psychiatry, Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, South Australia.Google Scholar
  48. Montville, J. V. (1987). Psychoanalytical enlightenment and the greening of diplomacy. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 37, 297–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Novae, A. (1994, May). Clinical heterogeneity in children of Holocaust survivors. Newsletter of World PsychiatricAssociation, pp. 24–26.Google Scholar
  50. Novas, A., and Hubert-Schneider, S. (1998). Acquired vulnerability: Comorbidity in a patient population of adult offspring of Holocaust survivors. American Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 19(2), 45–58.Google Scholar
  51. Ornstein, A. (1981). The effects of the Holocaust on life-cycle experiences: The creation and recreation of families. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 145(2), 135–163.Google Scholar
  52. Pennebaker, J. W, Barger, S. D., and Tiebout, J. (1989). Disclosure of trauma and health among Holocaust survivors. Psychosomatic Medicine, 51, 577–589.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Pynoos, R. S. ( 1996, March). The repercussion of traumatic expectations within and across the generations. Presentation at the 6th IPA Conference on Psychoanalytic Research, London, England.Google Scholar
  54. Pynoos, R. S., and Eth, S. (1985). Children traumatized by witnessing acts of personal violence: Homicide, rape or suicide behavior. In S. Eth and R. S. Pynoos (Eds.), Post-traumatic stress disorder in children (pp. 45–70 ). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  55. Rappaport, E. A. (1968). Beyond traumatic neurosis: A psychoanalytic study of late reactions to the concentration camp trauma. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49, 719–731.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  56. Remer, R., and Elliott, J. (1988a). Characteristics of secondary victims of sexual assault. International Journal of Family Psychiatry, 9, 373–387.Google Scholar
  57. Remer, R., and Elliott, J. (1988b). Management of secondary victims of sexual assault. International Journal of Family Psychiatry, 9, 389–401.Google Scholar
  58. Robin, R. W, Chester, B., and Goldman, D. (1996). Cumulative trauma and PTSD in American Indian communities. In A. J. Marsella, M. J. Friedman, E. T. Gerrity, and R. M. Scurfield (Eds.), Ethnocultural aspects ofposttraumatic stress disorder: Issues, research, and clinical applications (pp. 239–253 ). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Roht-Arriaza, N. (Ed.). (1995). Impunity and human rights in international law and practice. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Satir, V. (1972). Peoplemaking. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.Google Scholar
  61. Schwartz, S., Dohrenwend, B. P., and Levav, I. (1994). Nongenetic familial transmission of psychiatric disorders? Evidence from children of Holocaust survivors. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 35, 385–402.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Shriver, D. W, Jr. (1995). An ethic for enemies: Forgiveness in politics. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  63. Solomon, Z. (1995). Oscillating between denial and recognition of PTSD: Why are lessons learned and forgotten? Journal of Traumatic Stress, 8(2), 271–282.Google Scholar
  64. Spicer, E. H. (1971). Persistent cultural systems: A comparative study of identity systems that can adapt to contrasting environments. Science, 174, 795–800.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Stamatopoulou, E. (1996). Violations of human rights: The contribution of the United Nations Centre for Human Rights and the High Commissioner for Human Rights. In Y. Danieli, N. S. Rodley, and L. Weisaeth (Eds.), International responses to traumatic stress: Humanitarian, human rights, justice, peace and development contributions, collaborative actions and future initiatives (pp. 101–129 ). Published for and on behalf of the United Nations. Amityville, NY: Baywood.Google Scholar
  66. Symonds, M. (1980). The “second injury” to victims. Evaluation and Change [special issue], 36–38.Google Scholar
  67. Tennant, C. C., Goulston, K., and Dent, O. (1993). Medical and psychiatric consequences of being a prisoner of war of the Japanese: An Australian follow-up study. In J. P. Wilson and B. Raphael (Eds.), International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes (pp. 231–239 ). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Terr, L. C. (1985). Children traumatized in small groups. In S. Eth and R. S. Pynoos (Eds.), Post-traumatic stress disorder in children. [The Progress in Psychiatry Series, David Spiegel, Series Ed.] (pp. 45–70 ). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  69. Van der Kolk, B. A., McFarlane, A. C., and Weisaeth, L. (Eds.). (1996). Traumatic stress: The effects of overwhelming experience on mind, body and society. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  70. Webber, T. L. (1978). Deep like the rivers. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  71. Winnicott, D. W. (1965). The maturational processes and the facilitating environment. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yael Danieli
    • 1
  1. 1.Private PracticeGroup Project for Holocaust Survivors and Their ChildrenNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations