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Abstract

It is now more than 30 years since Henry Kempe was credited with “rediscovering” child abuse (Kempe, Silverman, Steele, Droegemueller, & Silver, 1962). Since then, there has been a sustained international effort to afford effective protection to children. Yet, today, a large number of children continue to suffer. What is worse, when these children themselves become parents, many are unable to protect their offspring or may actually inflict the suffering they themselves endured. This intergenerational legacy of trauma has become known as the “cycle of abuse.”

Keywords

Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Family Violence Child Protection Intergenerational Transmission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Buchanan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Social StudiesUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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