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Transmission of Trauma

The Argentine Case
  • Lucila Edelman
  • Diana Kordon
  • Darío Lagos
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Between 1976 and 1983, a military dictatorship overthrew the Argentine government and installed itself by means of state terrorism. During this period, the worst form of political repression in Argentina’s entire history was carried out. It was characterized by the illegal detention of many people in clandestine prisons and the “disappearance” of about 30,000 people, the majority of whom were killed after having endured terrible tortures; the illegal detention in known prisons of more than 10,000 people over a long period of time (more than 2 years), who also underwent torture and inhuman conditions of detention; murders, many of which were carried out to set an “example” (for instance, a few bodies were dynamited together); the kidnapping of children and the changing of their identity (more than 400 are still missing); and hundreds of thousands of people who went to other countries as refugees.1

Keywords

Personal Identity Communal Violence Transitional Justice Military Dictatorship True Story 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucila Edelman
    • 1
  • Diana Kordon
    • 1
  • Darío Lagos
    • 1
  1. 1.Equipo Argentino de Trabajo e Investigacion PsicosocialBuenos AiresArgentina

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