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In Vivo and in Vitro Role of Gamma Interferon in Immune Clearance of Rickettsia species

  • Thomas R. Jerrells
  • Han Li
  • David H. Walker
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 239)

Abstract

Members of the genus Rickettsia are obligate intracellular bacteria, and due to the intracellular location of their growth, they present a unique challenge to the immune system. Since antibody cannot gain entrance to viable cells, it has been argued that antibody does not play a major role in the effector phase of immunity to these organisms.

Keywords

L3T4 Cell Scrub Typhus Spotted Fever Rickettsial Infection Rickettsia Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas R. Jerrells
    • 1
  • Han Li
    • 1
  • David H. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Route F-09University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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