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Sweetener markets, marketing and product development

  • M. G. Lindley

Abstract

Sweetener markets are dynamic and have changed dramatically over the last two decades. The development of new products and the increased level of awareness of health and nutrition have both contributed significantly to these changes, although in the latter case not always with sound underlying logic.

Keywords

Sugar Alcohol Sweetness Intensity Elsevier Apply High Fructose Corn Syrup Intense Sweetener 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

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  • M. G. Lindley

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