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Externalizing Conditions

  • John E. Lochman
  • Renata G. Szczepanski
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Externalizing behavior problems are the most common reasons that children and adolescents are referred for mental health services (Lochman & Lenhart, 1995). Similarly, behavior problems are a common reason for referral to special education services, to school counselors, and to alternative education programs in school settings. Externalizing behavior problems include physical aggression (e.g., hitting, kicking, biting), verbal aggression (e.g., threatening others with use of force), other contranormative or oppositional behaviors (e.g., lying, truancy, running away, theft, fire setting), hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, and weak attentional regulations. In this chapter, we review the characteristics, assessment, and intervention for two subsets of externalizing behavior problems, namely aggressive and oppositional behaviors and attention deficit and hyperactive behaviors.

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Conduct Disorder Externalize Behavior Problem ADHD Child Aggressive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Lochman
    • 1
  • Renata G. Szczepanski
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Arts and SciencesUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.Duke UniversityDurhamUSA

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