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Determinants of Psychosocial Disorders in Cultural Minority Children

  • Vicki L. Schwean
  • David Mykota
  • Lorna Robert
  • Donald H. Saklofske
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

What is culture? According to Miller (1993), culture is a shared way of looking at the world, a coherent framework of meaning in which individuals make their lives. It is a “social fact,” a collective or group property that individuals experience as both external and constraining. Culture marginalizes some ways of acting and legitimizes others; culture is not simply “our” way of experiencing the world, it is also the “right way.” It is a moral order, inculcating a moral commitment to “our way” in its members. The socialization process ensures that collective standards of conduct are internalized by members, that is, that society’s ways become “my” way (Miller, 1993).

Keywords

Aboriginal People Acculturative Stress Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Canadian Population Psychosocial Distress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vicki L. Schwean
    • 1
  • David Mykota
    • 1
  • Lorna Robert
    • 1
  • Donald H. Saklofske
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and Special EducationUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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