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Early Identification and Intervention of Psychosocial and Behavioral Effects of Exceptionality

  • Tracy K. Wheatcraft
  • Bruce A. Bracken
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Before the mid-20th century, the primary research emphasis in early childhood identification and intervention was on the assessment of children’s intellectual abilities, with the goal of ensuring that children received appropriate educational opportunities (Kelley & Surbeck, 1991). Until the last few decades, early childhood psychosocial and behavioral disorders had received little attention from either researchers or practitioners. This lack of attention was due primarily to the prevailing sociocultural climate and the attitudes of past generations toward families and child-rearing responsibilities.

Keywords

Early Childhood Preschool Child Oppositional Defiant Disorder Oppositional Defiant Disorder Early Intervention Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tracy K. Wheatcraft
    • 1
  • Bruce A. Bracken
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA

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