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Psychosocial Perspectives on Exceptionality

  • Stephanie H. McConaughy
  • David R. Ritter
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

To begin a discussion of psychosocial perspectives on human exceptionalities, it is helpful to define terms and concepts used to label and classify physical, mental, and behavioral differences among individuals. Hardman, Drew, Egan and Wolf (1993) distinguished three common labels applied to individual differences. They defined a disorder as “a general malfunction in mental, physical, or psychological processes”; a disability as “a loss of physical functioning (e.g., loss of sight, hearing, or mobility) or difficulty in learning and social adjustment significantly interfering with normal growth and development;“ and a handicap as “a limitation imposed on the individual by environmental demands and is related to an individual’s ability to adapt or adjust to those demands” (p. 3).

Keywords

Social Competence Delinquent Behavior Learn Disability Learn Disability Regular Classroom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie H. McConaughy
    • 1
  • David R. Ritter
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.ONTOP ProgramBurlington School DistrictBurlingtonUSA

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