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Psychosocial Correlates of Learning Disabilities

  • Ruth Pearl
  • Mary Bay
Part of the Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Since the introduction of the term learning disabilities more than 35 years ago (Kirk, 1963), the use of this category to describe children with learning problems has increased to the point that this designation currently accounts for the largest group of children in special education in the United States. Despite the popularity of this label, lively disputes about the phenomenon of learning disabilities remain, even for such basic issues as how to define learning disabilities and how children with such disabilities should be identified (Kavale and Forness, 1985). As a result, the children identified as learning disabled are a heterogeneous group, with varied problems and strengths.

Keywords

Social Competence Learning Disability Disable Child Learning Disabil Learn Disability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Pearl
    • 1
  • Mary Bay
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology, College of EducationUniversity of IllinoisChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education, College of EducationUniversity of IllinoisChicagoUSA

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