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Postmodernism and Family Theory

  • William J. Doherty

Abstract

This chapter describes emerging developments in family theory in the last decade of the twentieth century. This task is at once easier and more difficult because it follows the 1993 publication of the comprehensive Sourcebook of Family Theories and Methods: A Contextual Approach (Boss, Doherty, LaRossa, Schumm, and Steinmetz, 1993). It is easier to catalog emerging theories about the family because a major section of the Sourcebook was devoted to newly emerging theories. But it is more difficult to say something new about the specific emerging theories that were covered in depth: phenomenology, feminism, biosocial, and race and ethnicity theories. Furthermore, the opening chapter of the Sourcebook put these emerging theories into the contexts of prior theories, developments in philosophy of science, and larger social and cultural developments (Doherty, Boss, LaRossa, Schumm, and Steinmetz, 1993).

Keywords

Family Therapy Feminist Theory Late Twentieth Century Symbolic Interactionism Contextual Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Doherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Family Social Science DepartmentUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA

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