Advertisement

Theories and Techniques of Marital and Family Therapy

  • Nadine J. Kaslow
  • Florence W. Kaslow
  • Eugene W. Farber

Abstract

Histories of the intertwined fields of marriage and family therapy have appeared during the past 2 decades (e.g., Broderick & Schrader, 1991; Guerin, 1976; F. Kaslow, 1982, 1987; Thomas, 1992). Elaborating upon an earlier version of this material (F. Kaslow, 1987), this chapter concentrates on developments in the past decade, a time during which the convergence of the marital and family therapy fields has been accepted.

Keywords

Family Therapy Behavioral Parent Training Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder Marital Therapy Functional Family Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ackerman, N. (1938). The unity of the family. Archives of Pediatrics, 55, 51–62.Google Scholar
  2. Alexander, J., & Parsons, B. V. (1982). Functional family therapy. Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  3. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (1982, rev. 1988 ). AAMFT code of ethical principles for marriage and family therapists. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  4. Andersen, T. (Ed.). (1991). The reflecting team: Dialogues and dialogues about the dialogues. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  5. Anderson, C. M., Griffin, S., Rossi, A., Pagonis, I., Holder, D. P., & Treiber, R. (1986). A comparative study of the impact of education versus process groups for families of patients with affective disorders. Family Process, 25, 185–206.Google Scholar
  6. Anderson, C. M., Reiss, D. J., & Hogarty, G. E. (1986). Schizophrenia and the family. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  7. Andolfi, M. (1979). Family therapy: An interactional approach. New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  8. Aponte, H. J. (1976). Underorganization in the poor family. In P. J. Guerin (Ed.), Family therapy: Theory and practice (pp. 432–448 ). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  9. Aradi, N. S., & Kaslow, F. W. (1987). Theory integration in family therapy: Definition, rationale, content and process. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 25, 598–608.Google Scholar
  10. Barton, C., & Alexander, J. (1981). Functional family therapy. In A. S. Gurman & D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 403–443 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  11. Bateson, G. (1972). Toward an ecology of mind. New York: Ballantine Books.Google Scholar
  12. Bateson, G., Jackson, D. D., Haley, J. E., & Weakland, J. (1956). Toward a theory of schizophrenia. Behavioral Science, 1, 251–264.Google Scholar
  13. Beavers, W. R. (1977). Psychotherapy and growth: Family systems perspective. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  14. Beavers, W. R. (1985). Manual of Beavers-Timberlawn Family Evaluation Scale and Family Style Evaluation. Dallas, TX: Southwest Family Institute.Google Scholar
  15. Beavers, W. R., & Hampson, B. B. (1990). Successful families: Assessment and intervention. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  16. Beck, A. T. (1988). Love is never enough. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  17. Beels, C., & Ferber, A. (1972). What family therapists do. In A. Ferber, M. Mendelsohn, and A. Napier (Eds.), The book of family therapy (pp. 168–232 ). New York: Science House.Google Scholar
  18. Bennun, I. (1986). Evaluating family therapy: A comparison of the Milan and problem solving approaches. Journal of Family Therapy, 8, 235–242.Google Scholar
  19. Berkowitz, B. P., & Graziano, A. M. (1972). Training parents as behavior therapists: A review. Behavioral Research and Therapy, 10, 297–317.Google Scholar
  20. Bodin, A. M. (1981). The interactional view. Family therapy approaches of the Mental Research Institute. In A. S. Gurman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 267–309 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  21. Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., & Framo, J. L. (1965). Intensive family therapy. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  22. Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., & Krasner, B. R. (1986). Between give and take: A critical guide to contextual therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  23. Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., & Spark, G. (1973). Invisible loyalties: Reciprocity in intergenerational family therapy. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  24. Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., Grunebaum, J., & Ulrich, D. (1991). Contextual therapy. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II ) (pp. 200–238 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  25. Bowen, M. (1988). Family therapy in clinical practice ( 2nd ed. ). Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  26. Boyd-Franklin, N. (1989). Black families in therapy: A multi-systems approach. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  27. Broderick, C. B., & Schrader, S. S. (1991). The history of professional marriage and family therapy. In A. S. Gurman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 3–40 ). New York: Brunner/ Mazel.Google Scholar
  28. Brown, G. W., Birley, J. L. T., & Wing, J. F. (1972). Influence of family life on the course of schizophrenic disorders: A replication. British Journal of Psychiatry, 121, 241–258.Google Scholar
  29. Carl, D. (1990). Counseling same-sex couples. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  30. Carr, A. (1991). Milan systemic family therapy: A review of ten empirical investigations. Journal of Family Therapy, 13, 237–263.Google Scholar
  31. Clarkin, J. K., Haas, G. L., & Glick, I. D. (Eds.). (1988). Affective disorders and the family: Assessment and treatment. New York; Guilford.Google Scholar
  32. Colapinto, J. (1991). Structural family therapy. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol.•II, pp. 417–443 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  33. Dell, P. (1981). Paradox redux. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 7, 127–134.Google Scholar
  34. DeShazer, S. (1985). Keys to solution in brief therapy. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  35. Doane, J. A., West, K. L., Goldstein, M. J., Rodnick, E. H., & Jones, J. E. (1981). Parental communication deviance and affective style: Predictors of subsequent schizophrenia spectrum disorders in vulnerable adolescents. Archives of General Psychiatry, 38, 679–685.Google Scholar
  36. Doane, J. A., Falloon, I., Goldstein, M. J., & Mintz, J. (1985). Parental affective style and the treatment of schizophrenia: Predicting course of illness and social functioning. Archives of General Psychiatry, 43, 34–42.Google Scholar
  37. Duhl, B. (1983). From the inside out and other metaphors: Creative and integrative approaches to training in systems thinking. New York:Google Scholar
  38. Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  39. Duhl, B. S., & Duhl, F. J. (1981). Integrative family therapy. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 483–516 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  40. Epstein, N. B., & Bishop, D. S. (1981). Problem-centered systems therapy of the family. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 444–482 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  41. Epstein, N. B., Bishop, D. S., & Levin, S. (1978). The McMaster model of family functioning. Journal of Marital and Family Counseling, 4, 19–31.Google Scholar
  42. Epstein, N., Schlesinger, S. E., & Dryden, W. (Eds.). (1988). Cognitive- behavioral therapy with families. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  43. Epstein, N., Bishop, D. S., Ryan, C., Miller, I., & Keitner, G. (1993). The McMaster model: View of healthy family functioning. In F. Walsh (Ed.), Normal family processes ( 2nd ed. ), pp. 138–160 ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  44. Everett, C., Halperin, S., Volgy, S., & Wissler, A. (1989). Treating the borderline family: A systemic approach. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  45. Falloon, I., Boyd, J., & McGill, C. (1984). Family care of schizophrenia. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  46. Fay, A., & Lazarus, A. A. (1984). The therapist in behavioral and multimodal therapy. In F. W. Kaslow (Ed.), Psychotherapy with psychotherapists (pp. 1–18 ). New York: Haworth.Google Scholar
  47. Feldman, L. B. (1992). Integrating individual and family therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  48. Fogarty, T. (1976). Systems concepts and the dimensions of self. In P. J. Guerin (Ed.), Family therapy: Theory and practice (pp. 144–153 ). New York: Gardner Press.Google Scholar
  49. Friedman, E. H. (1991). Bowen theory and therapy. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 134–170 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  50. Gengen, K. (1985). The social constructionist movement in modem psychology. American Psychologist, 40, 266–275.Google Scholar
  51. Goldenberg, I., & Goldenberg, H. (1991). Family therapy: An overview ( 3rd ed. ). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  52. Goldenthal, P. (1991). Contextual therapy with children and families. Innovations in clinical practice: A source book, 10, 85–97.Google Scholar
  53. Goodrich, T. J., Rampage, C., Ellman, B., & Halstead, K. (1988). Feminist family therapy: A casebook. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  54. Goolishian, H. A., & Anderson, H. (1990). Understanding the therapeutic process: From individuals and families to systems and language. In F. W. Kaslow (Ed.), Voices in family psychology (Vol. 1, pp. 91–113 ). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  55. Gordon, S. B., & Davidson, N. (1981). Behavioral parent training. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook offamily therapy (pp. 517555 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  56. Gordon, T. (1976). P.E.T. in action. New York: Peter H. Wyden. Greenberg, L. S., and Johnson, S. M. (1988). Emotionally focused therapy for couples. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  57. Guerin, P. J. (Ed.). (1976). Family therapy: Theory and practice. New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  58. Guemey, B. G., Jr. (Ed.). (1977). Relationship enhancement. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  59. Gunman, A. S. (1979). Dimensions of marital therapy: A comparative analysis. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 5, 5–18.Google Scholar
  60. Gunman, A. S. (1981). Integrative marital therapy: Toward the development of an interpersonal approach. In S. Budman (Ed.), Forms of brief psychotherapy (pp. 415–457 ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  61. Gurman, A. S., & Kniskem, D. P. (1992). The future of marital and family therapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, and Training, 29, 65–71.Google Scholar
  62. Haley, J. (1963). Strategies of psychotherapy. New York: Grune and Stratton. Haley, J. (1971). Changing families. New York: Grune and Stratton.Google Scholar
  63. Haley, J. (1973). Uncommon therapy: The psychiatric techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D.. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  64. Haley, J. (1976). Problem-solving therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  65. Haley, J. (1984). Ordeal therapy: Unusual ways to change behavior. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  66. Hazelrigg, M. D., Cooper, H. M., & Borduin, C. M. (1987). Evaluating the effectiveness of family therapies: An integrative review and analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 101, 428–442.Google Scholar
  67. Heiman, J. R., LoPiccolo, L., & LoPiccolo, J. (1981). The treatment of sexual dysfunction. In A. S. Gurman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 592–630 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  68. Hoffman, L. (1992). A reflective stance for family therapy. In S. McNamee and K. J. Gergen (Eds.), Therapy as social construction (pp. 7–24 ). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  69. Holtzworth-Munroe, A., & Jacobson, N. S. (1991). Behavioral marital therapy. In A. S. Gurman and D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 96–133 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  70. Hops, H., Wills, T. A., Patterson, G. R., & Weiss, R. L. (1972). Marital interaction coding system. Eugene: University of Oregon Research Institute.Google Scholar
  71. Jackson, D. D. (1957). The question of family homeostasis. Psychiatric Quarterly Supplement, 31, 79–90.Google Scholar
  72. Jacobson, N. S., & Margolin, G. (1979). Marital therapy: Strategies based on social learning and behavior exchange principles. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  73. Johnson, S. M., & Greenberg, L. S. (1987). Integration in marital therapy: Issues and progress. The International Journal of Eclectic Psychotherapy, 6, 202–215.Google Scholar
  74. Kantor, D., & Lehr, W. (1975). Inside the family: Toward a theory of family process. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  75. Kaplan, H. S. (1974). The new sex therapy: Active treatment of sexual dysfunction. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  76. Kaslow, F. W. (1980). History of family therapy in the United States: A kaleidoscopic overview. Marriage and Family Review, 3, 77–111.Google Scholar
  77. Kaslow, F. W. (1981a). Profile of the healthy family. Interaction, 4, 1–15.Google Scholar
  78. Kaslow, F. W. (1981b). A dialectic approach to family therapy and practice: Selectivity and synthesis. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 7, 345–351.Google Scholar
  79. Kaslow, F. W. (Ed.). (1982). The international book of family therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  80. Kaslow, F. W. (1987). Marital and family therapy. In M. B. Sussman and S. K. Steinmetz (Eds.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 835–859 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  81. Kaslow, F. (Ed.). (1990). Voices in family psychology (Vols. 1 and 2 ). Newbury Park: Sage.Google Scholar
  82. Kaslow, F. W. (1991). The art and science of family psychology: Retrospective and perspective. American Psychologist, 46, 621–626.Google Scholar
  83. Kaslow, F. W., & Hammerschmidt, H. (1992). Long term “good” marriages: The seemingly essential ingredients. In B. J. Brothers (Ed.), Couples therapy: Multiple perspectives (pp. 15–38 ). Binghamton, NY: Haworth.Google Scholar
  84. Kaslow, E W., & Schwartz, L. (1987). The dynamics of divorce: A life cycle perspective. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  85. Kaslow, N. J., & Celano, M. (1993). Family therapy. In A. S. Gunman & S. B. Messer (Eds.), Modern psychotherapies: Theory and practice (pp. 343–402 ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  86. Kaslow, N. J., & Gurman, A. S. (1985). Ethical considerations in family therapy research. Counseling and Values, 30, 47–61.Google Scholar
  87. Keith, D., & Whitaker, C. (1981). Play therapy: A paradigm for work with families. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 6, 243–254.Google Scholar
  88. Kempler, W. (1981). Experiential psychotherapy within families. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  89. Kirschner, D. A., & Kirschner, S. (1986). Comprehensive family therapy: An integration of systemic and psychodynamic treatment models. New York. Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  90. L’Abate, L. (1986). Systematic approach to family therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  91. L’Abate, L., & Weinstein, S. E. (1987). Structured enrichment programs for couples and families. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  92. LaPerriere, K. (1979). Family therapy training at the Ackerman Institute: Thoughts of form and substance. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 5, 53–58.Google Scholar
  93. Lebow, J. L. (1987). Integrative family therapy: An overview of major issues. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 24, 584–594.Google Scholar
  94. Leff, J., & Vaughn, C. (1981). The role of maintenance therapy and relatives’ expressed emotion in relapse of schizophrenia: A two-year follow-up. British Journal of Psychiatry, 139, 102–104.Google Scholar
  95. Levant, R. F. (Ed.). (1986). Psychoeducational approaches to family therapy and counseling. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  96. Lewis, J. M., Beavers, W. R., Gossatt, J. T., & Phillips, V. A. (1976). No single thread: Psychological health in family systems. New York: Brunner/ Mazel.Google Scholar
  97. Liberman, R. (1970). Behavioral approaches to family and couple therapy. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 40, 106–118.Google Scholar
  98. Liberman, R. P., Wheeler, E., deVisser, L. A. J. M., Kuehnel, J., & Kuehnel, T. (1980). Handbook of marital therapy: A positive approach to helping troubled relationships. New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  99. Liddle, H. (1985). Five factors of failure in structural/strategic family therapy: A contextual construction. In S. Coleman (Ed.), Failures in family therapy (pp. 151–189 ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  100. Luepnitz, D. A. (1988). The family interpreted: Feminist theory in clinical practice. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  101. MacGregor, R. (1990). Team family methods in the public sector. In F. W. Kaslow (Ed.), Voices in family psychology (Vol. 1, pp. 156–170 ). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  102. Madanes, C. (1981). Strategic family therapy. San Francisco: JosseyBass.Google Scholar
  103. Madanes, C. (1990). Sex, love, and violence. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  104. Markham, H. J., & Notarius, C. I. (1987). Coding marital and family interaction: Current status. In T. Jacob (Ed.), Family interaction and psychopathology: Theories, methods, and findings (pp. 329–390 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  105. Masters, W., Johnson, V., & Kolodny, R. (1986). On sex and human loving. Boston: Little, Brown.Google Scholar
  106. McFarlane, W. R. (Ed.). (1983). Family therapy in schizophrenia. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  107. McFarlane, W. R. (1991). Family psychoeducational treatment. In A. S. Gurman and D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 363–395 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  108. McGoldrick, M., & Gerson, R. (1985). Genograms in family assessment. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  109. McGoldrick, M., Anderson, C. M., & Walsh, F. (Eds.). (1989). Women in families: A framework for family therapy. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  110. McGoldrick, M., Pearce, J. K., & Giordano, J. (Eds.). (1982). Ethnicity and family therapy. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  111. Meth, R. L., & Pasick, R. S. (1990). Men in therapy: The challenge of change. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  112. Miklowitz, D. J., Goldstein, M. J., Falloon, I. R. H., & Doane, J. A. (1984). Interactional correlates of expressed emotion in the families of schizophrenics. British Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 482–487.Google Scholar
  113. Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and family therapy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  114. Minuchin, S., & Fishman, H. C. (1981). Family therapy techniques. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  115. Minuchin, S., Montalvo, B., Guemey, B., Rosman, B., & Schumer, F. (1967). Families of the slums. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  116. Minuchin, S., Rosman, B. L., & Baker, L. (1978). Psychosomatic families: Anorexia nervosa in context. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  117. Moultrup, D. (1986). Integration: A coming of age. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 8, 157–167.Google Scholar
  118. Napier, A. Y., & Whitaker, C. A. (1978). The family crucible. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  119. Neill, J. R., & Kniskem, D. P. (Eds.). (1982). From psyche to system: The evolving therapy of Carl Whitaker. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  120. Norcross, J. C., & Goldfried, M. R. (Eds.). (1992). Handbook of psychotherapy integration. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  121. Olson, D. H. (1970). Marital and family therapy: Integrative review and critique. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 32, 501–538.Google Scholar
  122. Olson, D., Sprenkle, D., & Russell, C. (1979). Circumplex model of marital and family systems: Cohesion and adaptability dimensions, family types, and clinical applications. Family Process, 18, 3–28.Google Scholar
  123. Olson, D. H., McCubbin, H. I., Barnes, H., Larsen, A., Muxen, M., & Wilson, M. (1983). Families: What makes them work. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  124. Papp, P. (1976). Family choreography. In P. J. Guerin (Ed.), Family therapy: Theory and practice (pp. 465–479 ).Google Scholar
  125. Patten, C., Barnett, T., & Houlihan, D. (1991). Ethics in marital and family therapy: A review of the literature. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 22, 171–175.Google Scholar
  126. Patterson, G. R. (1971). Families: Application of social learning to family life. Champaign, IL: Research Press.Google Scholar
  127. Patterson, G. R., Ray, R. S., Shaw, D. A., & Cobb, J. A. (1969). Manual for coding of family interactions (rev. ed.). New York: Microfiche Publications.Google Scholar
  128. Pinsof, W. M. (1983). Integrative problem-centered therapy: Toward the synthesis of family and individual psychotherapies. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 9, 19–35.Google Scholar
  129. Pinsof, W. M. (1995). Integrative problem centered therapy. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  130. Pittman, E (1993). Man enough: Fathers, sons, and the search for masculinity. East Rutherford, NJ: Putnam.Google Scholar
  131. Prata, G. (1990). A systemic harpoon into family games. New York: Brunner/ Mazel.Google Scholar
  132. Reiss, D. (1981). The family’s construction of reality. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  133. Roberto, L. G. (1991). Symbolic-experiential family therapy. In A. S. Gurman and D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 444–476 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  134. Roberto, L. G. (1992). Transgenerational family therapies. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  135. Sager, C. J., Brown, H. S., Crohn, H., Engel, T., Rodstein, E., & Walker, L. (1983). Treating the remarried family. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  136. Sander, E M. (1979). Individual and family therapy: Toward an integration. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  137. Satir, V. (1967). Conjoint family therapy. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.Google Scholar
  138. Satin, V. (1972). Peoplemaking. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.Google Scholar
  139. Satir, V., & Baldwin, M. (1983). Satir step by step: A guide to creating change in families. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.Google Scholar
  140. Scharff, J. S. (Ed.). (1989). Foundations of object relations family therapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  141. Scharff, D. E., & Scharff, J. S. (1987). Object relations family therapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  142. Schwartz, L. S., & Kaslow, E W. (1997). Painful partings: Divorce and its aftermath. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  143. Segal, L. (1991). Brief therapy: The MRI approach. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (Vol. II, pp. 171–199 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  144. Selvini Palazzoli, M. (1974). Self starvation. London: Human Context Books.Google Scholar
  145. Selvini Palazzoli, M., Boscolo, L., Cecchin, G., & Prata, G. (1978). Paradox and counterparadox. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  146. Selvini Palazzoli, M., Cirillo, S., Selvini, M., & Sorrentino, A. M. (1989). Family games: General models of psychotic processes in the family. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  147. Slipp, S. (1988). The technique and practice of object relations family therapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  148. Stanton, M. D. (1981). Strategic approaches to family therapy. In A. S. Gurman and D. P. Kniskem (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 361402 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  149. Stanton, M. D., & Todd, T. (1982). The family therapy of drug abuse and addiction. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  150. Stuart, R. B. (1980). Helping couples change: A social learning approach to marital therapy. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  151. Sugarman, S. (Ed.). (1986). The interface of individual and family therapy. Rockville, MD: Aspen Publishers.Google Scholar
  152. Szykula, S. A., Morris, S. B., & Sudweeks, C. (1987). Child-focused behavior and strategic therapies: Outcome comparisons. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 24, 546–551.Google Scholar
  153. Textor, M. R. (1988). Integrative family therapy. International Journal of Family Psychiatry, 9, 93–105.Google Scholar
  154. Thomas, M. B. (1992). An introduction to marital and family therapy: Counseling toward healthier family systems across the lifespan. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  155. Tomm, K. M. (1984a). One perspective on the Milan approach: Part I. Overview of development, theory and practice. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 10, 113–125.Google Scholar
  156. Tomm, K. M. (1984b). One perspective on the Milan approach: Part II. Description of session format, interviewing style, and interventions. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 10, 253–271.Google Scholar
  157. Treppen, T. S., & Barrett, M. J. (1989). Systemic family treatment of incest. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  158. Visher, E., and Visher, J. (1987). Old loyalties, new ties: Therapeutic strategies with stepfamilies. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  159. Wachtel, E. E, & Wachtel, P. L. (1986). Family dynamics in individual psychotherapy: A guide to clinical strategies. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  160. Wallerstein, J. S., & Kelly, J. B. (1980). Surviving the breakup: How children and parents cope with divorce. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  161. Walsh, E (Ed.). (1993). Normal family processes ( 2nd ed. ). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  162. Walters, M., Carter, B., Papp, P., & Silverstein, O. (1988). The invisible web: Gender patterns in family relationships. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  163. Watzlawick, P., Weakland, J., & Fisch, R. (1974). Change: Principles of problem formation and problem resolution. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  164. Whitaker, C. (1976). The hindrance of theory in clinical work. In P. J. Guerin, Jr. (Ed.), Family therapy: Theory and practice (pp. 154–164 ). New York: Gardner.Google Scholar
  165. Whitaker, C. A., & Bumberry, W. M. (1988). Dancing with the family: A symbolic-experiential approach. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  166. Whitaker, C. A., & Keith, D. V. (1981). Symbolic-experiential family therapy. In A. S. Gunman & D. P. Kniskern (Eds.), Handbook of family therapy (pp. 187–225 ). New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadine J. Kaslow
    • 1
  • Florence W. Kaslow
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Eugene W. Farber
    • 5
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics and PsychologyEmory University, and Grady Health SystemAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Florida Couples and Family InstitutePalm Beach GardensUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical Psychology in PsychiatryDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  4. 4.School of Professional PsychologyFlorida Institute of TechnologyMelbourneUSA
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

Personalised recommendations