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Family Dynamics

An Essay on Conflict and Power
  • Jetse Sprey

Abstract

This chapter deals with the dynamics of process in contemporary marriages and families, while focusing especially on the ongoing interplay between the conflicts of interest and the reciprocal use of power that underlies the day-to-day existence of those involved in these social arrangements. It does not offer a comprehensive overview of the current state of theorizing and research on the phenomenon of conflict or the use of power. Competent recent treatments of such and related issues are available in the literature (cf. Boss, 1987; Farrington & Chertok, 1993; Steinmetz, 1987; Szinovacz, 1987). Instead, this chapter reflects on the current knowledge about conflict and power with the aim of rethinking and strengthening its explanatory capacity.

Keywords

Family Study Family Violence American Family Family Dynamics Family Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jetse Sprey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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