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Economics and the Family

  • Paul S. Carlin

Abstract

It has only been in the last 30 years that modern economic analysis has been brought to bear on the family. The pioneering work in this area was done by Nobel laureate Gary Becker in the 1960s and 1970s as has since been consolidated into his monograph, A Treatise on the Family (1981, 1991). Since that time some of the primary areas of interest for economists have been: (1) factors influencing marriage formation and dissolution; (2) economic consequences of divorce and separation; (3) time allocation within the family, including changing patterns of labor supply for married women and time devoted to household tasks by married men and women; (4) trends in earnings inequality; (5) trends in wage inequality between women and men; (6) poverty, welfare reform, and the interactions between income maintenance, dependency, and family stability; (7) altruism and intergenerational transfers of wealth and human capital (educational and learning abilities); (8) the economic status of the elderly; and (9) the economic status of children. All of these issues are addressed in this chapter, but time allocation and issues relating to poverty and welfare receive disproportionate weight.

Keywords

Labor Supply Labor Force Participation Married Woman Child Support Divorce Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul S. Carlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsIndiana University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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