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Families and Religions

  • Patricia Wittberg

Abstract

The respective roles of religion and the family—and the relationships between these roles—have been redefined several times throughout history. The current popular image of a father, a mother, and two small children praying together in a church pew on Sunday is a relatively recent formulation—and is already seriously out-of-date In this chapter, we first survey the roles for religion and the family that have been devised in other societies and during other historical epochs. We then explore how the rise of Protestantism led to our current stereotype of Church and family. Finally, we survey research on how contemporary developments in each institution are affecting the other.

Keywords

Religious Affiliation Marital Satisfaction Corporal Punishment Church Attendance Religious Participation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Wittberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIndiana University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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