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Methodological Pluralism and Qualitative Family Research

  • Jane F. Gilgun

Abstract

Methodological pluralism is the hallmark of contemporary research on families Such pluralism is not likely to go away because it is firmly embedded in tradition and in the methodological transformations current in the social and human sciences. Practicing in a wide array of disciplines, family scholars are being swept up in—and helping to create—the exciting possibilities these transformations present. Such possibilities are so recent that the words of LaRossa and Reitzes (1993), written not long ago, although compelling, soon will be outdated. They wrote, “family research is for the most part dominated by relatively static models and methodologies” (p. 158), an observation other family scholars have articulated (e.g., Osmond, 1987; Thomas & Wilcox, 1987). The exploration of methodological stasis in family research will provide a context in which to interpret the state of contemporary qualitative family research methods. As I will show, methodological stasis is a relatively recent phenomenon. Research on families stands on a tradition of methodological pluralism.

Keywords

Qualitative Research Family Therapy Critical Theory Negro Family Qualitative Researcher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane F. Gilgun
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of Minnesota, Twin CitiesSt. PaulUSA

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