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Creating the Conditions for Creativity in Reader Response to Literature

  • Carolyn A. Colvin
  • Roger Bruning
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

In many classrooms today, the major task of students is to acquire and demonstrate a set of skills that are consistent with instructional objectives. Many educators would agree wholeheartedly with this focus and its implications of goal directedness, objectivity of measurement, and accountability. At the same time, however, an objectives-oriented classroom prescribes a particular role for the student, that of “achiever of objectives.” Certainly, the real lives of students are vastly richer in their many dimensions than this narrow role as achiever of objectives can give expression to. To the extent that this role is emphasized and valued over others, students’ experiences in schools correspondingly have become circumscribed, even impoverished in their scope. Lying untouched are students’ interests, their values, and, indeed, the full array of their capabilities as human beings.

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Episodic Memory Semantic Memory Literary Work Creative Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolyn A. Colvin
    • 1
  • Roger Bruning
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Teacher EducationSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA

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